Addiction Counselling

What is Addiction?


If you have an addiction, you're not alone. According to the charity Action on Addiction, one in three of us are addicted to something. Addiction is defined as not having control over doing, taking or using something to the point where it could be harmful to you.

 

Addiction is most commonly associated with gambling, drugs, alcohol and nicotine, but it's possible to be addicted to just about anything. Some of the more common addictions include:

 

Drug addiction

 

Alcohol addiction

 

Gambolling addiction

 

Food addiction

 

Co-dependency

 

Sex and love addiction

 

 

 

What causes addictions?

 

There are lots of reasons why addictions begin. In the case of drugs, alcohol and nicotine, these substances affect the way you feel, both physically and mentally. These feelings can be enjoyable and create a powerful urge to use the substances again.

 

Gambling may result in a similar mental "high" after a win, followed by a strong urge to try again and recreate that feeling. This can develop into a habit that becomes very hard to stop.

 

Being addicted to something means that not having it causes withdrawal symptoms, or a "come down". Because this can be unpleasant, it's easier to carry on having or doing what you crave, and so the cycle continues.

Often, an addiction gets out of control because you need more and more to satisfy a craving and achieve the "high".

 

How addictions can affect you?

 

The strain of managing an addiction can seriously damage your work life and relationships. In the case of substance abuse (for example, drugs and alcohol), an addiction can have serious psychological and physical effects.

 

Some studies suggest addiction is genetic, but environmental factors, such as being around other people with addictions, are also thought to increase the risk.

 

An addiction can be a way of blocking out difficult issues. Unemployment and poverty can trigger addiction, along with stress and emotional or professional pressure.